Course Listings

To learn how to register for these courses or for more information, please contact the registrar at registrar@eds.edu.

Courses scheduled for the 2014-15 academic year are subject to change. Students enrolled at EDS who wish to register for courses should login to SelfServe for complete and up-to-date course information. The last day to add/drop courses in Fall 2014 is September 12. 

Online-only courses are designated by (Online). Simulcast courses are designated by (Simulcast).

Questions? Contact Cecelia Cull, Registrar, at registrar@eds.edu, or call 617-682-525. 

Fall 2014 Courses | January 2015 Courses | Spring 2015 Courses | June 2015 Courses


Fall 2014

Foundations (FTP)

FTP 1010.CR01: Foundations For Theological Praxis
Suzanne Ehly 
August 26-29, 9:30am-4:30pm
September 16, October 28, November 18, and December 16, 9:30-11:30am
4 Credits 

“Foundations” is the Episcopal Divinity School’s way of introducing incoming master’s program students to the understandings and commitments underlying the school’s purpose statement “to form leaders of hope, courage, and vision” who “serve and advance God’s mission of justice, compassion, and reconciliation.” Students will consider vocation both as the call to personal transformation and to act as God's agents of change and liberation in the world. Analysis will consider personal, interpersonal, institutional, and cultural power dynamics and will focus on race and racism as it informs our understanding of other forms of oppression. Through experiential learning, class presentations, and assignments, students will reflect on how their own social location shapes their actions and thinking while developing tools for theological reflection, social analysis, and engagement in the struggle for the renewal of the Church and the world.

Limited to EDS masters students and required of first-semester MDiv and MATS candidates. Occasionally non-masters students may enroll with permission of the instructors.  

Hebrew Bible (HT)

HB 1030.OL01: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible: Exodus to Exile (Online)
Dr. Gale Yee
September 3 - December 19, 2014
Times TBA 
3 Credits 

An introduction to the literature and theologies of the First Testament/Hebrew Bible, as well as to the history, society, cultures, and religions of ancient Israel in the context of the ancient Near East from the Exodus to the Exile. Enrollment Note: This course is online only and limited to 12 students enrolled as EDS DL students. 

New Testament (NT)

NT 1020.CR01: Introduction to the New Testament
Dr. Lawrence Wills 
September 3 - December 19, 2014
Mondays, 2:00-3:30PM and Wednesdays 3:00-4:40PM
Sherrill Library, Room 250
3 Credits 

An introduction to the literature of the New Testament in its historical, social, and theological context. Attention will be given to learning basic exegetical techniques. 

Church History (CH)

CH 1100.SC01: Early Christianity (Simulcast)
The Rev. Dr. Patrick S. Cheng
September 3 - December 19, 2014
Wednesdays, 9:30-11:30AM
Sherrill Library, Room 155
3 Credits

This class is a survey of the history of Christianity in its first thousand years. Major issues will include Christian origins and its Jewish roots; the diversity of early Christian theologies, including gnosticism and orthodoxy; martyrdom and the rise of monasticism; questions of faith and order; trinitarian and christological controversies; and Christianity in Africa and Asia. The course will also focus on the challenges and opportunities facing the church throughout the first millennium, including its encounter with Islam and other faith traditions.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online students. Preference is given to EDS Final Year students. 


CH PT 2502.SC01: History, Polity, Canon Law (Simulcast)

Instructor The Rev. Dr. Cameron Partridge
September 3-December 19, 2014
Mondays, 2:00-4:00PM
Sherrill Library, Room 250
3 Credits

This survey course will give students a working knowledge of the history (histories), ethos, and cultures of The Episcopal Church including an appreciation of both the highlights and the challenges of Anglicanism in the United States.  Included will be a study of the practice of The General Convention and an investigation into The Constitution and Canons of The Episcopal Church.  The history and polity of The Episcopal Church will be placed within the context of the global Anglican Communion. The ability to apply insights as religious leaders to pastoral and missional contexts will guide the course.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online students. Preference is given to EDS Final Year students. 

Liturgy (L)

L1234.CR01: Singing the Faith
Ellen Oak
September 3 - December 19, 2014
Wednesdays, 12:45-2:45PM and Thursdays 11:45AM-1:15PM
St. John's Memorial Chapel
1 Credit

Through preparing choral music with the Chapel Choir for Thursday community worship and special events, students will integrate body, mind, and spirit; develop their leadership skills; expand their view of the theological, liturgical, cultural, and musical diversity of Christian sung prayer; and deepen their understanding of the transforming power of the arts in both personal and public spheres. Students MUST participate EACH WEEK in BOTH Wednesday 12:45-2:45PM rehearsal AND Thursday 11:30AM-1:15PM warm-up and worship. In addition, a modest amount of reading and writing are required.

L PT 2310.CR01: Ordination Studies: Public Representative Ministry with the Community of the Baptisimal Covenant
The Rev. Dr. Stephen Burns
September 3 - December 19, 2014
Mondays, 9:30-11:30AM
Sherrill Library, Room 250
3 Credits

Using the core texts Paul Bradshaw, Rites of Ordination (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2014) and Gordon W. Lathrop, The Pastor: A Spirituality (Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press, 2006) this course will explore contemporary theologies of ordained ministry in an ecumenical context, but with special attention to contemporary Anglican theologies, and a particular focus on the Berkeley Statement "Equipping the Saints" and critique of the Book of Common Prayer 1979's sometimes inconsistent convictions about ordination and the ministry of the baptized.

Theology (T)

T 1044.CR01: Introduction to Liberation Theology (Simulcast)
Dr. Kwok Pui Lan
September 3 - December 19, 2014
Thursdays, 9:30-11:30AM
Sherrill Library, Room 250
3 Credits

What is liberation theology? Who does it? Why is it important to the church? How do traditional theologians and critics respond to it? This introductory course will discuss the many strands of liberation theology from different global contexts. The focus will be on liberation theology’s methodologies, its relation to the social context, and its challenges to the theological discipline.

Enrollment Note: This course is available for in class students as well as up to 12 students enrolled as online simulcast students.

T CH 2710.SC01: 20th Century Anglican Theologians (Simulcast)
The Rev. Dr. Stephen Burns; Dr. Patrick S. Cheng; Dr. Kwok Pui Lan
September 3 - December 19, 2014
Mondays, 7:00-9:00PM
Sherrill Library, Room 155
3 Credits

This course discusses the development of theologies in the Anglican Communion in the twentieth century through studying the works of representative Anglican theologians from diverse contexts. We will focus on Anglican identity, Gospel and culture, struggle for justice for minorities and the marginalized, relation between the local and the global, and issues facing the Communion today.

T PT 2165.CR01: Mission, Ministry, and Sacraments: Re-visioning the Church Inside-Out
The Rev. Dr. Christopher Duraisingh
September 3 - December 19, 2014
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00PM
Sherrill Library, Room 250
3 Credits

This course seeks to construct a theology of the Church the essential nature of which is its 'inside-turned-outness' for the life of the world. In the light of this basic stance of a church as a people – externally focused and God's-Reign oriented – a theological re-visioning of the central elements of the Church's sacramental life, worship, witness, and ministry is undertaken. A central question is how we can recover the basic calling of the Church to be a sign and instrument of a God-intended 'alternative humanity' and an agent of transformation in a world characterized by oppressive, exclusivist, and fragmenting forces. Faith-filled resistance, compassionate solidarity, and creative hope shall serve as significant categories in such a re-visioning. Participants will explore the practical and pastoral implications of such a re-visioning for the empowerment of local congregations as change agents.

Writing (W)

W 1235.CR01: Writing Theology Well: From Theological Reflection to Biblical Exegesis
Lucretia Yaghjian
September - October (Dates TBD)
Fridays, 10:00AM-12:00PM
Room TBD
1 Credit 

This six week course provides an introduction to writing in a theological context, focusing on the standard theological genres of theological reflection, theological argument, the constructive theological essay in its various applications (church history, Christian ethics, pastoral studies) and biblical exegesis, including a biblical exegesis research workshop with EDS Senior Research Librarian Aura Fluet in conjunction with the course. Weekly theological memos will offer opportunities to experiment with these theological genres, and to integrate their requirements with the resonances of the student's voice. Toward that end, students will choose a paper assigned for one of their EDS courses in one of these genres to be submitted concurrently for completion in this course. The course format will feature Power Point presentations based on Lucretia Yaghjian's Writing Theology Well, "hands-on" writing workshops, and writing consultation sessions with the instructor.

W 1236.CR01: Writing Theological Research Well: Reviewing the Basics, Retooling the Process
Lucretia Yaghjian and Aura Fluet
November 7 - December 12
Fridays, 1:00-4:00PM
Sherrill Library Room 153
1 Credit

This six week mini-course reviews the basics of writing theological research by engaging students in the writing of a theological research project from its inception to its completion. The course may be taken in tandem with W2323, "Theological Library Research," as a research writing tutorial, or as a free-standing course. Students will choose an MA/MDiv thesis project or research paper assignment from one of their EDS classes to work on in conjunction with this course. They will learn how to generate a research question; identify a research methodology appropriate to their project; review relevant literature related to their topic; formulate a research thesis; develop an extended research argument; navigate the conventions of quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing, and citing research sources in footnotes and bibliography; and design a research-writing template that can be adapted to the requirements of the various research assignments encountered in graduate-level theological study. The course format includes Power Point presentations based on Lucretia Yaghjian's Writing Theology Well, writing workshops, and writing consultation sessions with the instructor.

W2323.CR01: Theological Library Research
Aura Fluet and Lucretia Yaghjian
November 7 - December 12
Fridays, 1:00-4:00PM
Sherrill Library Room 153
1 Credit 

The advent of the digital age has irrevocably changed the landscape of research but it has not fundamentally altered the complexity of the research process. In fact, it could be argued that while computer based research brings the libraries of the world to the desktop it is more difficult than ever to evaluate and synthesize the sheer wealth of information that is available. This course is an introduction to library research for students enrolled in masters level and certificate degree programs in theological studies. Its practical aim is to introduce students to the online and print information resources, available through the Library and on the Web, which can be accessed in writing their research papers/projects. Through a process of inquiry, hands-on workshops, and guided by the research questions they have formulated, students create their own network of resources integrating new information into their knowledge base as they begin writing their research. This course is also designed to address the growing need of students to become conversant with emerging technologies, to become effective researchers as students and life-long learners.


January 2015

Hebrew Bible (HT)

HB 1130.CR01 The Book of Genesis
Dr. Gale Yee
January 5 - January 16, 2015
Monday to Friday, 2:00-4:00PM
Sherrill Library, Room 153
3 Credits

This exegesis course is an intensive study of the traditions in the book of Genesis regarding the primeval history: creation, "fall," flood, and Tower of Babel (Genesis 1-11); and the mothers and father of ancient Israel: Abraham, Sarah, and Hagar, Isaac and Rebekah, Jacob, Leah and Rachel, and Joseph and Asenath (Genesis 12-50). Students will be introduced to the various historical, sociological, and literary critical methods of biblical interpretation.

New Testament (NT)

NT 2050.CR01: Paul in the 21st Century
Dr. Lawrence Wills
January 5 - January 16, 2015
Monday to Friday, 2:00-4:00PM
Sherrill Library, Room 250
3 Credits

This course will introduce Paul’s theology in three steps. First, we will read parts of 1 Corinthians, Galatians, and Romans to try to understand Paul in his ancient context. Second, we will consider the changing ways that Paul was understood in the twentieth century, leading up to the so-called New Perspective on Paul. Third, we will conclude with a consideration of how recent approaches, such as critical race theory, feminist criticism, postcolonial criticism, queer theology, and so on have uncovered new challenges for Paul in the twenty-first century, but new promises as well.

Liturgy (L)

L 1025.CR01: Liturgical Theology and Practice
The Rev. Dr. Stephen Burns
January 5 - January 16, 2015
Monday to Friday, 4:10-6:00PM
Sherrill Library, Room 155
3 Credits

This course maps the contours of contemporary liturgical theology, noting numerous historical developments whilst concentrating on engagements between inherited traditions of Christian assembly and our current inter-cultural, multi-religious and shifting spiritual contexts. The rites and resources of The Episcopal Church are embedded in the course, yet situated in a wider frame that takes in ecumenical consensus and dissent from it—with a range of liberation theologies welcomed to animate optics on each topic in the schema of study.

L1234.CR01: Singing the Faith
Ellen Oak
September 3 - December 19, 2014
Monday to Thursday, 8:30-9:15AM and Thursdays, 11:45AM-1:15PM
St. John's Memorial Chapel
1 Credit

Through preparing choral music with the Chapel Choir for Thursday community worship and special events, students will integrate body, mind, and spirit; develop their leadership skills; expand their view of the theological, liturgical, cultural, and musical diversity of Christian sung prayer; and deepen their understanding of the transforming power of the arts in both personal and public spheres. Students MUST participate EACH WEEK in rehearsal Monday-Thursday 8:30am-9:15am, and Thursdays 11:30AM-1:15PM warm-up and worship. In addition, a modest amount of reading and writing are required.

Theology (T)

T 2411.CR01: Eros, Sexuality, Spirituality
Dr. Kwok Pui Lan
January 5 - January 16, 2015
Monday to Friday, 4:10-6:00PM
Sherrill Library, Room 250
3 Credits

What has sexuality to do with spirituality? Why are Christians afraid of Eros? Why is it difficult to talk about Eros and sexuality in the church? Why are mainline denominations preoccupied with issue of human sexuality? What has the erotic to do with our spiritual practice? This course introduces recent writings on these issues, including novels, autobiographies, theological and spiritual writings.

Theory Practice/Ministry (PT)

PT L 1420.CR01: Unleashing Our Voices: Voice, Identity, and Leadership
Suzanne Ehly
January 5 - January 16, 2015
Monday to Friday, 9:30-11:30AM
Tyler Room, Burnham Hall
3 Credits

A course for the courageous, who wish to explore first-hand the liberatory and transformative power of their voices in community. Using the classroom community as a laboratory, the course will combine (1) practical work on voice production and the body/mind/soul as human instrument with (2) in-class discussion and small team exploration of readings on voice, identity/community membership and leadership. Voice work will include group exercises for freeing the body and voice, as well as individual work in front of the group using prepared spoken texts and/or sung pieces. Readings will be drawn from writings on the physical voice and voice as an element of social location from womanist, feminist, anti-white supremacist and other anti-oppression perspectives. Participants will engage questions of voice and power in pastoral, liturgical, theological, educational and spiritual contexts.

Limited to 12 students. No auditors. Students will attend all sessions, even if registering for the two credit option.

Prerequisite: FTP 1010: Foundations for Theological Praxis

Spring 2015

Hebrew Bible (HT)

HB PT 2250.CR01: Teaching and Preaching Texts of Terror
Dr. Angela Bauer-Levesque
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Thursday, 9:30-11:30AM
Sherrill Library
3 Credits

Creation is nearly destroyed by the flood, the promised land is inhabited before the "conquest," women are raped, daughters sacrificed, men tortured, people "punished." And God...? Where do we begin when we read these texts in the Bible or the daily paper? How do we preach texts where terror takes the place of good news? How do we respond to violence in biblical texts (and in contemporary situations)? The course will explore various biblical texts and theological/ethical issues through critical exegesis; we will work on sermons and other theo-ethical and pastoral responses. Prerequisite: some study in the Bible and in Theology/Ethics. Limited to 12. Faculty Approval is needed to enroll.

New Testament (NT)

NT 1330.CR01: The Gosepl of Matthew
Dr. Lawrence Wills 
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Mondays, 2:00-4:00PM
Sherrill Library
3 Credits 

An exegesis of Matthew that will focus on the social world of the gospel in addition to its theology. The course will also include brief comparisons with Jewish and Christian texts of the period, such as Wisdom of Solomon, Qumran texts, James, and Didache.

Church History (CH)

CH 1510.SC01: The English Reformations (Simulcast)
Elise Feyerherm
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Thursdays, 4:00-6:00PM
Sherrill Library, Room 155
3 Credits

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online students. Preference is given to EDS Final Year students. 

Liturgy (L)

L 1040.CR01: Liturgical Practicum
Jeff Mello
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Fridays, 9:30-11:30AM
St. John's Chapel
3 Credits

This workshop encompasses the nuts and bolts of enacting the various liturgies of the church. Training for practical worship and musical leadership is affected through confronting the structure and meaning of the rites as enacted and by expanding students' facility for leading worship by means of vocal and movement exercises.

L1234.CR01: Singing the Faith
Ellen Oak
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Time TBD
St. John's Memorial Chapel
1 Credit

Through preparing choral music with the Chapel Choir for Thursday community worship and special events, students will integrate body, mind, and spirit; develop their leadership skills; expand their view of the theological, liturgical, cultural, and musical diversity of Christian sung prayer; and deepen their understanding of the transforming power of the arts in both personal and public spheres. Students MUST participate EACH WEEK in BOTH Wednesday 12:45-2:45PM rehearsal AND Thursday 11:30AM-1:15PM warm-up and worship. In addition, a modest amount of reading and writing are required.

L 2400.SC01: Prayerbook(s) for the 21st Century (Simulcast)
Rev. Dr. Stephen Burns
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Mondays, 9:30am-11:30AM
Sherrill Library, Room 155
3 Credits

This course will offer an in-depth and critical look at the Book of Common Prayer 1979 and trace subsequent liturgical revision in the Episcopal Church. The concerns of Enriching Our Worship, a revised sanctorale, and foci of same-sex blessing and anti-Semitic textual change will be explored. The possible future of revision will be projected whilst pathways through current contradictions will be proposed. The course will reference the BCP, EOW & Holy Women, Holy Men, as well as Lorraine S. Brugh and Gordon W. Lathrop, The Sunday Assembly (Using Evangelical Lutheran Worship) (Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Press, 2008); Colin Buchanan, ed., Anglican Eucharistic Liturgies, 1985-2010 (Norwich: Canterbury Press, 2011); Stephen Burns, ed., Liturgical Spirituality: Anglican Reflections on the Church's Prayer (New York, NY: Church Publishing, 2013); Steven Croft, et al, eds, Ancient Faith, Future Mission: Fresh Expressions in the Sacramental Tradition (New York, NY: Church Publishing, 2010); Mark Earey, Beyond Common Worship: Anglican Identity and Liturgical Diversity (London: SCM Press, 2013); Mary Gray-Reeves and Michael Perham, The Hospitality of God: Emerging Worship for a Missional Church (New York, NY: Church Publishing, 2011); Paul V. Marshall and Lesley Northup, eds, Leaps and Boundaries: The Prayer Book in the Twentyfirst Century (Harrisburg, PA: Morehouse, 1997); Ruth A. Meyers, ed., A Prayer Book for the Twenty-first Century? (New York, NY: Church Publishing, 1996) and Louis Weil, Liturgical Sense: The Logic of Rite (New York, NY: Seabury, 2013).

* practicum because students will be asked to rework texts and rituals of the prayer book.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online students. Preference is given to EDS Final Year students.

Theology (T)

T 2030.SC01: Sin, Grace, and Atonement (Simulcast)
Rev. Dr. Patrick Cheng
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Wednesdays, 7:00-9:00PM
Sherrill Library, Room 250
3 Credits

How might the doctrines of sin, grace, and atonement speak to progressive people of faith today? This course will examine the biblical, historical, and theological foundations of these doctrines. Specific topics to be covered will include original sin, structural sin, various atonement theories (for example, the ransom, satisfaction, and moral influence theories), and interfaith notions of sin. The course will conclude by assessing critiques and reconstructions of these doctrines by feminist, womanist, queer, and other contemporary theologians.

Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online students. Preference is given to EDS Final Year students.

T CS 2913.CR01: The Sacred and the Self in World Religions: Explorations in Comparative Theology
The Rev. Dr. Christopher Duraisingh
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Tuesdays, 4:00-6:00PM
Sherrill Library
3 Credits

Now more than ever, it is an imperative that Christian theological task is undertaken in active dialogue and cross-reference with one or more of the other religious traditions of the world. This course will undertake a "dialogical" theology around two central themes, namely, the Sacred and the Self in comparative conversation with selected major religious traditions of the world. An adequate method for such a theological task will be explored through examining the recent development of the discipline known as 'comparative theology.' At the heart of the course lies the conviction that any formation for theological and ministerial leadership today is parochial and poorer if it is not done in serious dialogue and comparative study of other religious traditions.

Ethics (E)

E 1010.SC01: Introduction to Christian Ethics (Simulcast)
Rev. Dr. Joan Martin
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Thursday, 4:00-6:00PM
Sherrill Library, Room 155
3 Credits

This course introduces students to the field of Christian Ethics. The question, “What is Christian ethics?” is addressed in this introductory course. Responses are formed from different major perspectives and themes in Christian tradition from individual thinkers, communities of faith and larger social contexts. Focus is given to forms, sources and norms for Christian ethics, and to methodologies used in moral reflection and decision making. Offered every other year as one of three courses fulfilling the minimum competence as an introduction to the field.

Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online students. Preference is given to EDS Final Year students.

Theory Practice/Ministry (PT)

T PT 3051.CR01: Queer Theology and Pastoral Care
Rev. Dr. Patrick Cheng
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Tuesdays, 2:00-4:00PM
Sherrill Library
3 Credits

This course will provide a survey of the development of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) theologies from the 1950s through today, with a particular focus on the pastoral care of LGBTQ persons. Topics to be covered include scriptural texts of terror, coming out, pastoral counseling, same-sex unions and marriages, and spiritual direction.

PT 1050.CR01: Pastoral Offices
Frank Fornaro
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Wednesdays, Time TBD
3 Credits

Description Forthcoming.

PT CS 2040.CR01: Evangelism for Liberation
Liz Magill
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Wednesdays, 4:00-6:00PM
Sherill Library
3 Credits

Description Forthcoming.

PT L 1420.CR01: Unleashing Our Voices: Voice, Identity, and Leadership

Suzanne Ehly
February 6-7, March 6-7, April 17-18
Fridays 4:00-6:00PM, Saturday's 9:00AM-4:30PM
Tyler Room, Burnham Hall
3 Credits

A course for the courageous, who wish to explore first-hand the liberatory and transformative power of their voices in community. Using the classroom community as a laboratory, the course will combine (1) practical work on voice production and the body/mind/soul as human instrument with (2) in-class discussion and small team exploration of readings on voice, identity/community membership and leadership. Voice work will include group exercises for freeing the body and voice, as well as individual work in front of the group using prepared spoken texts and/or sung pieces. Readings will be drawn from writings on the physical voice and voice as an element of social location from womanist, feminist, anti-white supremacist and other anti-oppression perspectives. Participants will engage questions of voice and power in pastoral, liturgical, theological, educational and spiritual contexts.

Limited to 12 students. No auditors. Students will attend all sessions, even if registering for the two credit option.

Prerequisite: FTP 1010: Foundations for Theological Praxis

Liturgy (L)

L1234.CR01: Singing the Faith
Ellen Oak
January 26 - May 12, 2015
Wednesdays, 12:45-2:30PM
St. John's Memorial Chapel
1 Credit

Through preparing choral music with the Chapel Choir for Thursday community worship and special events, students will integrate body, mind, and spirit; develop their leadership skills; expand their view of the theological, liturgical, cultural, and musical diversity of Christian sung prayer; and deepen their understanding of the transforming power of the arts in both personal and public spheres. Students MUST participate EACH WEEK in BOTH Wednesday 12:30-2:30PM rehearsal AND Thursday 11:30AM-1:15PM warm-up and worship. In addition, a modest amount of reading and writing are required.

Writing (W)

W 1235.CR01: Writing Theology Research: WRITE for Thesis Writers (Online)
Lucretia Yaghjian
Dates TBD
1 Credit

This six week module adapts the WRITE course (WR 1236) to an online environment, with a focus on writing the theological thesis well. The course is being offered out of the conviction that writing a theological thesis is both a personal labor of love and a public academic performance, requiring the successful integration of one's writing voice and research methodology into a well-crafted argumentative essay, documented and formatted according to appropriate academic conventions. Toward that end, course participants will review the basics of writing theological research by writing their own MA, MDiv, or D.Min. thesis projects (or parts thereof). They will learn how to generate a research question; identify a research methodology appropriate to their project; review relevant literature related to their topic; formulate a research thesis; develop an extended research argument; navigate the conventions of quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing, and citing research sources in footnotes and bibliography; and design research-writing templates adapted to the requirements of their thesis projects.

June 2015

Foundations (FTP)

FTP 1010.CR01: Foundations For Theological Praxis
Suzanne Ehly 
June 8 - June 19, 2015
Week 1: Tuesday-Friday, 9:30AM-4:30PM, Week 2: Monday-Friday, 9:30AM-11:30AM
Tyler Room, Burnham Hall
4 Credits 

“Foundations” is the Episcopal Divinity School’s way of introducing incoming master’s program students to the understandings and commitments underlying the school’s purpose statement “to form leaders of hope, courage, and vision” who “serve and advance God’s mission of justice, compassion, and reconciliation.” Students will consider vocation both as the call to personal transformation and to act as God's agents of change and liberation in the world. Analysis will consider personal, interpersonal, institutional, and cultural power dynamics and will focus on race and racism as it informs our understanding of other forms of oppression. Through experiential learning, class presentations, and assignments, students will reflect on how their own social location shapes their actions and thinking while developing tools for theological reflection, social analysis, and engagement in the struggle for the renewal of the Church and the world.

Limited to EDS masters students and required of first-semester MDiv and MATS candidates. Occasionally non-masters students may enroll with permission of the instructors. 

Hebrew Bible (HT)

HB NT 4120.CR01: Jews and Christians
Dr. Lawrence Wills
June 8 - June 19, 2015
Monday to Friday, 4:00-6:00PM
Sherrill Library
3 Credits

This exegesis course is an intensive study of the traditions in the book of Genesis regarding the primeval history: creation, "fall," flood, and Tower of Babel (Genesis 1-11); and the mothers and father of ancient Israel: Abraham, Sarah, and Hagar, Isaac and Rebekah, Jacob, Leah and Rachel, and Joseph and Asenath (Genesis 12-50). Students will be introduced to the various historical, sociological, and literary critical methods of biblical interpretation.

Liturgy (L)

L1234.CR01: Singing the Faith
Ellen Oak
June 8 - June 19, 2015
Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday  4:45-5:45PM ; and Thursday 11:15AM-1:15PM
St. John's Memorial Chapel
1 Credit

Through preparing choral music with the Chapel Choir for Thursday community worship and special events, students will integrate body, mind, and spirit; develop their leadership skills; expand their view of the theological, liturgical, cultural, and musical diversity of Christian sung prayer; and deepen their understanding of the transforming power of the arts in both personal and public spheres. Students MUST participate Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from 4:45pm-5:45p m, and Thursdays 11:30AM-1:15PM warm-up and worship. In addition, a modest amount of reading and writing are required.

L 2020.CR01: Spirituality for Presiding

The Rev. Dr. Stephen Burns
June 8 - June 19, 2015
Monday to Friday, 7:00-9:00PM
Sherrill Library
3 Credits

A course focused on the nurture of leadership in Christian celebration, exploring both kinaesthetic arts and the pastoral, public and representative vocation of the one who presides.

L PT 1320.CR01: Feeding the Fire of Sung Prayer in Christian Communities
Ellen Oak
June 8 - June 19, 2015
Monday to Friday, 9:30-11:30AM
St. John's Memorial Chapel
3 Credits

This course is for clergy, professional musicians, and laypeople. It will address these questions: What will we sing on Sunday morning? Why does it matter? How will we choose? Who are the stakeholders in the decision-making process? The goal is growth toward competency in: 1) Building an intellectual scaffolding (includes theological, historical, cultural, ritual, and musical considerations) for the study of christian sacred music to support lifelong learning; 2) Using relevant research tools; 3) Learning a packet of representative songs well enough to be able to teach them to a congregation; 4) Developing best practices for creative and rewarding collaborative ministry among musicians, clergy, and the communities they serve.

Theology (T)

T 2040.CR01: Heaven, Hell, and Last Things
Rev. Dr. Patrick Cheng
June 8 - June 19, 2015
Monday to Friday, 4:00-6:00PM
Sherrill Library
3 Credits

This course will explore the doctrine of eschatology, or last things. Topics to be covered will include heaven, hell, purgatory, limbo, angels, demons, eternal punishment, and the Last Judgment. We will examine the biblical, historical, and theological foundations of this doctrine, as well as how contemporary reconstructions of these topics might speak to progressive Christians today. Interfaith perspectives, both East and West, will also be considered.

T PT 2323.CR01: Spirituality of Healing
Kwok Pui Lan
June 8 - June 19, 2015
Monday to Friday, 2:00-4:00PM
Sherrill Library
3 Credits

This course explores the spiritual foundations of healing, including mind and body connection, breaking the cycle of violence, and developing life­affirming spiritual practices. Particular emphasis will be on healing from internalized racism, homophobia, and other forms of structural oppression. There will be opportunities to study Chinese approaches to healing.

Ethics (E)

E T 1430.CR01: African American Christian Social Ethics: Sex and Sexuality
Rev. Dr. Joan Martin
June 8 - June 19, 2015
Monday to Friday, 2:00-4:00PM
Sherrill Library
3 Credits

There is a growing recognition and movement within Black churches and among Black and Womanist theologians to bring sex, sexuality, and the erotic 'out of the closet' in African American Christianity and into the light. This course will explore some of the strands of black sexuality and their relation to the Black Church, with the intention of addressing the implications and possibilities for developing a more healthy attitude and approach to issues of sex, sexuality, and ethical leadership for ministry. The course pedagogy will, in part, be determined by interest and class enrollment.

Theory Practice/Ministry (PT)

PT CS 2080.CR01: Church Redevelopment
Instructor TBA
June 8 - June 19, 2015
Monday to Friday, 2:00-4:00PM
Sherrill Library
3 Credits

Description Forthcoming.

PT 1912.CR01: Spiritual Direction
SSJ
June 8 - June 19, 2015
Monday to Friday, 4:00-6:00PM
Sherrill Library
3 Credits

An introduction to the art of spiritual direction, designed to assist ministers (ordained or lay) in listening to the spiritual experience of others.

PT 2000.CR01 abd PT 2000.CR02: General Convention of the Episcopal Church
The Rev. Dr. Cameron Partridge 
2 Credits: Course Only
3 Credits: General Convention Course and attend Convention

This course is designed to prepare persons to either participate or follow the events that occur at the General Convention. Students who are intending to attend the Convention will receive full credit and students who do not attend the General Convention may take the two credit option for this course. Emphasis will be placed on the resolutions and reports contained in the so-called "Blue Book" which serves as the basis for legislative action. Equal attention will be paid to issues and process. [2 credit course; 1 additional credit if attending Convention]

DMin

DMin 1000.CR01: Ministerial Perspectives on the DMin 1
Rev. Dr. Joan Martin
June 8 - June 19, 2015
Week 2: Monday to Friday, 9:30-11:30AM
Sherrill Library
3 Credits

An introduction to the DMin program, including: the history of the EDS DMin program, degree program process, and program formation. In the colloquium, participants discuss their ministerial contexts, future ministerial direction, and a projected program of courses that leads to a thesis proposal and project.

DMin 2000.CR01: Approaches to Anti-Racist Ministry
Suzanne Ehly
June 8 - June 19, 2015
Week 1: Tuesday-Friday, 9:30AM-4:30PM; Week 2: Monday-Friday, 9:30-Noon
Tyler Room, Burnham Hall
3 Credits

This course introduces DMin students to the personal, interpersonal, cultural, and institutional dimensions of antiracism work. Students will explore how this work relates to their ministry and thesis project.