Course Listings

To learn how to register for these courses or for more information, please contact the registrar at registrar@eds.edu.

Courses scheduled for the 2015–16 academic year are subject to change. Students enrolled at EDS who wish to register for courses should login to SelfServe for complete and up-to-date course information. The last day to add/drop courses in Fall 2015 is September 18, 2015. 

Registration for Boston Theological Institute and Lifelong Learning students opens on July 1, 2015. 

Online-only courses are designated by (Online). Simulcast courses are designated by (Simulcast).

Questions? Contact Cecelia Cull, Registrar, at registrar@eds.edu, or call 617-682-525. 

Fall 2015 Courses | January 2016 Courses


Fall 2015 (September 9
December 23, 2015)

Foundations (FTP)

FTP 1010.CR01: Foundations for Theological Praxis
September 14, 9:30am4:30pm; September 22, October 20, November 17, and December 1, 9:30-11:30am
Tyler Room (Burnham Hall)
4 Credits 

“Foundations” is Episcopal Divinity School’s way of introducing incoming master’s program students to the understandings and commitments underlying the school’s purpose statement “to form leaders of hope, courage, and vision” who “serve and advance God’s mission of justice, compassion, and reconciliation.” Students will consider vocation both as the call to personal transformation and to act as God's agents of change and liberation in the world. Analysis will consider personal, interpersonal, institutional, and cultural power dynamics and will focus on race and racism as it informs our understanding of other forms of oppression. Through experiential learning, class presentations, and assignments, students will reflect on how their own social location shapes their actions and thinking while developing tools for theological reflection, social analysis, and engagement in the struggle for the renewal of the church and the world.

Limited to EDS masters students and required of first-semester MDiv and MATS candidates. Occasionally non-masters students may enroll with permission of the instructors.  

Hebrew Bible (HT)

HB 1030.CR01: Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures
September 9December 23, 2015
Monday, 2:004:00pm; Wednesday, 3:004:00pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 250
3 Credits 

An introduction to the literature and theologies of the First Testament/Hebrew Bible, as well as the history, society, cultures, and religions of ancient Israel in its ancient Near Easter contexts. A focus on the hermeneutical issues that arise from reading the text from different social locations.

New Testament (NT)

NT 1530.CR01: Gospel of John
September 9December 23, 2015
Thursday, 2:004:00pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 250
3 Credits 

An exegesis course on John’s gospel, emphasizing the literary development of the gospel, the reconstruction of the author’s community, and its relation to Judaism.

Church History (CH)

CH L 2321.SC01: The Book of Common Prayer (Simulcast)
September 9December 23, 2015
Thursday, 7:009:00pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 155
3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the development of the Book of Common Prayer beginning with sixteenth-century England and leading up to the Book of Common Prayer 1979 of the Episcopal Church. Attention will be paid especially to the content and theology of the current BCP and the supplemental materials found in Enriching Our Worship, as well as to current discussions about ongoing liturgical revision in The Episcopal Church.

Liturgy (L)

L1234.CR01: Singing the Faith
September 3December 19, 2014
Wednesday, 1:003:00pm; Thursday, 11:30am12:00pm
St. John's Memorial Chapel
1 Credit

Through preparing choral music with the Chapel Choir for Thursday community worship and special events, students will integrate body, mind, and spirit; develop their leadership skills; expand their view of the theological, liturgical, cultural, and musical diversity of Christian sung prayer; and deepen their understanding of the transforming power of the arts in both personal and public spheres. Students must participate each week in both Wednesday 1:00-3:00pm rehearsal and Thursday 11:30am-12:00pm warm-up and worship. In addition, a modest amount of reading and writing are required.

Theology (T)

T 1025.SC01: Introduction to Systematic Theology (Simulcast)
September 9December 23, 2015
Monday, 7:009:00pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 155
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the sources, methods, and major doctrines of Christian theology. Topics to be covered include revelation, the persons and functions of the trinity, sin and grace, the church and sacraments, missiology, and last things. Particular attention will be paid to the historical development as well as the contemporary reconstructions of such doctrines.

T CS 3020.CR01: Advanced Theology Seminar: Contextual Theologies—Methods, Issues, and Comparisons
September 9December 23, 2015
Tuesday, 2:004:00pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 153
3 Credits

Progressing from two key assumptions that no theology is disinterested, and that any theology done outside of its context(s) is both parochial and inadequate, this seminar will explore the sources, methods, and pertinent issues in doing Christian theology in particular contexts. It will draw into dialogue selected theologies, such as ‘Dalit’ (India), Minjung (Korea), Liberation (Latin America, U.S. Latino/a), Black (Africa, U.S.), Womanist/Feminist and Indigenous peoples’ theologies (Americas, Pacific). Post-colonial, economic, gender, race and other historically non-dominant identity markers will provide the lenses for analysis of a pluralistic world both in terms of religions and cultures. G

Ethics (E)

E T 1280.SC01: Basics in Anglican Moral Theology (Simulcast)
September 9December 23, 2015
Wednesday, 7:009:00pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 155
3 Credits

The focus on this course is the historical theological and ethical development of Anglican moral theology and contemporary concerns of the Episcopal Church. Foundational thinkers, methods, themes, and related aspects of the moral life will be outlined and students will participate in class presentations. This course serves as an introductory course for competence in the field.

Theory Practice/Ministry (PT)

CS PT 2045.CR01: Local Congregations and Neighbors of Other Faiths: Worship, Caring, and Other Pastoral Issues
September 9-December 23, 2015
Friday, 9:00am-12:00pm (Bi-weekly, including site visits)
Sherrill Hall, Room 155
2 Credits

This bi-weekly 2-credit course will alternate visits to spaces of worship and pastoral care of Muslim, Jewish, and Hindu neighbors of local Christian congregations with in-class discussions of differences and similarities in worship, caring, and other pastoral issues. Interfaith chaplaincy will also be explored. G

PT 2540.SC01: Queer Theologies and Pastoral Care with Youth and Young Adults (Simucalst)
September 9-December 23, 2015
Thursday, 4:00-6:00pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 155
3 Credits

This course will engage theological, theoretical, contextual, and practical resources for doing queer-affirming pastoral care with and for LGBTQI youth and young adults. Together we will consider how queer theologies might assist Christian leaders and communities in bearing supportive witness to the complex, evolving identities of these chronologically contiguous yet distinct groups. We will explore some of the contextual and developmental specificities that can inform pastoral care with these groups. We will also consider how, in addition to pastoral conversations, such care can invite queer individuals and communities into creative theological expression through modes such as narrative, image, and ritual. Course materialsreadings and other mediawill draw from the fields of queer Christian theology, pastoral theology, queer theory, and critical childhood and sociological studies. Course assignments will invite the creation of practical theological resources as well as call for careful, critical reflection upon course materials.

Writing (W)

W 1236.CR01: Writing Theological Research Well: Reviewing the Basics, Retooling the Process
October 16December 4
Friday, 9:30am12:30pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 155
1 Credit

This six week mini-course reviews the basics of writing theological research by engaging students in the writing of a theological research project from its inception to its completion. The course may be taken in tandem with W2323, "Theological Library Research," as a research writing tutorial, or as a free-standing course. Students will choose an MA/MDiv thesis project or research paper assignment from one of their EDS classes to work on in conjunction with this course. They will learn how to generate a research question; identify a research methodology appropriate to their project; review relevant literature related to their topic; formulate a research thesis; develop an extended research argument; navigate the conventions of quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing, and citing research sources in footnotes and bibliography; and design a research-writing template that can be adapted to the requirements of the various research assignments encountered in graduate-level theological study. The course format includes Power Point presentations based on Lucretia Yaghjian's Writing Theology Well, writing workshops, and writing consultation sessions with the instructor.

W 2323.CR01: Theological Library Research
October 16December 4
Friday, 9:30am12:30pm
Sherrill Library Room 155
1 Credit

The advent of the digital age has irrevocably changed the landscape of research but it has not fundamentally altered the complexity of the research process. In fact, it could be argued that while computer based research brings the libraries of the world to the desktop it is more difficult than ever to evaluate and synthesize the sheer wealth of information that is available. This course is an introduction to library research for students enrolled in masters level and certificate degree programs in theological studies. Its practical aim is to introduce students to the online and print information resources, available through the Library and on the Web, which can be accessed in writing their research papers/projects. Through a process of inquiry, hands-on workshops, and guided by the research questions they have formulated, students create their own network of resources integrating new information into their knowledge base as they begin writing their research. This course is also designed to address the growing need of students to become conversant with emerging technologies, to become effective researchers as students and life-long learners. Co-requisite with W 1236.CR01: Writing Theological Research Well: Reviewing the Basics, Retooling the Process. 


January 2016 (January 4
January 15, 2016)

Hebrew Bible (HT)

HB 1110.CR01: The Book of Isaiah
January 4January 15, 2016
Monday to Friday, 2:004:00pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 153
3 Credits

Taking into account the social locations of the reader(s) as well as the texts, this course enters the worlds of Isaiah of Jerusalem as well as the Isaianic poet-prophet of the Exile and after through exegetical study of the Isaianic corpus. Special attention will be given to lectionary passages and to theological issues related to preaching from the Book of Isaiah.

HB 1135.CR01: Psalms and Worship
January 4January 15, 2016
Monday to Friday, 4:00-6:00pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 155
3 Credits

This course examines the Psalms in their original contexts in ancient Israel and how they have been used liturgically and musically by Jews and Christians since the beginning of the Common Era. Prerequisites: HB 1030 or equivalent.

New Testament (NT)

NT 2040.CR01: The Social World of Ancient Jews and the First Followers of Jesus
January 4January 15, 2016
Monday to Friday, 4:106:00pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 155
3 Credits

What did the first followers of Jesus look like? What did they do? How would we describe them as a social group, and in terms of race, class, gender, ability, social organization, citizenship, etc.? What would their worship and practices look like? This course brings sociological and anthropological resources to bear on ancient Jews and the appearance of the first followers of Jesus. We will concentrate on the first century CE, but also consider the separation of Christianity from Judaism in the early second century CE.

Liturgy (L)

L 1040.CR01: Liturgical Practicum
January 4January 15, 2016
Monday to Friday, 9:3011:30am
St. John's Memorial Chapel
3 Credits

This workshop encompasses the nuts and bolts of enacting the various liturgies of the church. Training for practical worship and musical leadership is affected through confronting the structure and meaning of the rites as enacted and by expanding students’ facility for leading worship by means of vocal and movement exercises.

L1234.CR01: Singing the Faith
January 4January 15, 2016
Monday to Friday, 4:106:00pm
St. John's Memorial Chapel
1 Credit

Through preparing choral music for weekly Eucharist and special events, students will develop skills in musical presidership; study church history and theology in diverse repertoire of sung prayer; and deepen their understanding of the power of music and the arts in both personal and public spheres.

Theology (T)

T CS 1512.CR01: Christology and Cultural Imagination
January 4January 15, 2016
Monday to Friday, 2:004:00pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 250
3 Credits

This course introduces the insights of cultural studies to theological reflection. We will discuss the cultural phenomenon of the quest for the historical Jesus, Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ, Jesus in spirituals and other Gospel music, Jesus and masculinity, as well as images of Jesus from diverse contexts. The aim is to develop an expansive understanding of Christology through interaction with arts and other cultural productions. Artists and other guests will be invited to enrich class discussion.

Ethics (E)

E CS 2610.CR01: Globalization: Mission, Theology, and Ethics
January 4January 15, 2016
Monday to Friday, 4:106:00pm
Sherrill Hall, Room 250
3 Credits

Globalization is an undeniable political, social, economic, and cultural reality. Why and how should we be engaging with its effects? As well as looking at how Christians use and contest global trends, we will explore how the church should be responding—theologically, ethically, and practically—to issues such as global warming, economic and trade disparities, migration, poverty, cultural homogenization, and the challenges of co-existence among varied faith communities. The role and responses of those marginalized by global processes will be explored.

Theory Practice/Ministry (PT)

PT L 1420.CR01: Unleashing Our Voices: Voice, Identity, and Leadership
January 4January 15, 2016
Monday to Friday, 9:1511:45am
Tyler Room (Burnham Hall)
3 Credits

A course for the courageous, who wish to explore first-hand the liberatory and transformative power of their voices in community. Using the classroom community as a laboratory, the course will combine (1) practical work on voice production and the body/mind/soul as human instrument with (2) in-class discussion and small team exploration of readings on voice, identity/community membership and leadership. Voice work will include group exercises for freeing the body and voice, as well as individual work in front of the group using prepared spoken texts and/or sung pieces. Readings will be drawn from writings on the physical voice and voice as an element of social location from womanist, feminist, anti-white supremacist and other anti-oppression perspectives. Participants will engage questions of voice and power in pastoral, liturgical, theological, educational and spiritual contexts.

Limited to 12 students. No auditors. Students will attend all sessions, even if registering for the two credit option.

Prerequisite: FTP 1010: Foundations for Theological Praxis.